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How to Use Optical Flow in Adobe Premiere Pro CC (2019)

Learn how to use Optical Flow in Adobe Premiere Pro.
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Optical Flow is a great tool that Adobe has implemented into their software. It allows you to take footage shot at a low frame-rate, and slow it down like it was shot at a high frame-rate. This feature has been in Premiere Pro for sometime now, but has only recently started to work really well. It’s a quick and simple thing to test out, so let’s get started. Today I am going to show you how to use Optical Flow in Adobe Premiere Pro.

How to Use Optical Flow in Adobe Premiere Pro CC

  1. Create a new sequence, or navigate to an existing sequence. Add or find the footage you want to slow down.

Method 1: Speed/Duration

  1. Right click on your footage and go down to Speed/Duration.
  2. Inside the menu, slow your footage down to something like 50%. You can maybe stretch it to 25%, but anything past this will most likely look bad.
  3. At the bottom of the menu where it says “Time Interpolation:”. Change this to “Optical Flow”.
  4. Your clip may need to be rendered out to view without being choppy. To do this hit the “enter” key on your keyboard, or go up to Clip->Render In to Out.

Method 2: Time Remapping

  1. Right click on the footage and go to Show Clip Keyframes->Time Remapping->Speed.
  2. Extend your clip down on the timeline to see the speed line.
  3. Create keyframes and and adjust the speed within the timeline. (More in-depth tutorial on that here)
  4. Right click on your footage, go down to Time Interpolation->Optical Flow.
  5. Your clip may need to be rendered out to view without being choppy. To do this hit the “enter” key on your keyboard, or go up to Clip->Render In to Out.

There you have it, a quick and easy way to add some optical flow to your clip. This effect works on about 80% of clips. If you have a really complex background, then the optical flow can start to add a bubbly effect. In this case, try slowing it down less to reduce the effect. The opposite is also true. If you have a really simple background, you can speed it up a lot. For example, on a green screen, you can bring a clip down to 5% or even 1% and have it look perfect!

If you have any questions, feel free to comment below, or on the video itself!

Other Premiere Pro Tutorials:

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